Egg eating snakes

Egg eating snakes

We can find different foraging and feeding modes among snakes, that may be attributed to each species' behavior and physical adaptations. Heavier bodied, terrestrial snakes are usually ambush specialists who sit and wait for large prey in high traffic areas, staying motionless until their food is at range distance. On the other hand, the slender and light bodied arboreal snakes conceal themselves in the canopy by moving gracefully and mimicking branches while searching for their prey; this is a behavior known as active foraging. Between the active foragers, there are some opportunistic species that feed not only on the animals they find, but also on their eggs; obtaining more nutrition for the invested energy. This is the oophagous snakes.

The similar differentiation can be made within the oophagous: big, hard eggs are predated by bigger, stronger snakes; while small, hard to access eggs are eaten by smaller and more flexible predators. For example, Phrynonax poecilonotus (Mica pajarera), like most heavy bodied semiarboreals, tend to eat avian eggs (while birds usually nest on sturdy surfaces), while Leptodeira septentrionalis (northern cat's eyes), representing the slender completely arboreal serpents, prefers frog eggs (who usually lay on branches and leaves close to the water).

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Spirits eats eggs

We can find different ways foraging and feeding among snakes, which can be attributed to the behavior and physical adaptations of each species. The lander and heavier snakes are usually ambush specialists who expect their prey in high traffic areas, standing still until the food is within range. On the other hand, tree snakes, thinner and lighter, are hidden between the crowns of the trees, moving gently and imitating branches as they seek their prey, this behavior is called active foraging. Among the active fodder, there are some opportunistic species that not only feed on the animals they find, but also their eggs; obtaining more nutrition by the inverted energy. These are serpent serpents.

A similar differentiation can be made between serpent snakes: larger, harder eggs are predated by larger, stronger snakes, while small, hard-to-reach eggs are eaten by more predators small and flexible. For example Prynonax p oecilonotus (Mica aviary), like most heavy semiarboric vegetables, tend to eat bird eggs; however, Leptodeira septentrionalis (northern cat eyes), representing fully arboreal snakes feeds on frog eggs (usually attached to leaves and branches near water).

  • Adam Floyd