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Source text - English Proper Mulching Techniques Key to Healthy Trees

CHAMPAIGN, IL- Mulching is one of the most beneficial things a homeowner can do to keep trees healthy - it makes growing situations more "friendly" for trees in general. But over-mulching can be one of the worst landscaping mistakes you can make, causing significant damage to trees and other plants.

"All things in moderation should be a homeowner's mulching motto," says Jim Skiera, Executive Director of the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). "As beneficial as mulch is, it is very harmful in more ways than one."

The generally recommended mulching depth is 2 to 4 inches, according to the ISA. When applied properly, mulch helps to maintain soil moisture, control weeds, improve soil structure, and inhibit certain plant diseases. Mulch also protects plants and trees from "weed whacker" damage and "lawnmower blight" in addition to giving planting beds a uniform, well cared-for look.

But too much mulch - be it layers deep or piled high against tree trunks - can cause major problems for homeowners, including:

· Excess moisture in the root zone, which causes plant stress and root rot; Insect and disease problems; · · · ·
Weed growth;
Smelly planting beds, caused by anaerobic conditions and "sour" mulch;
Habitat creation for rodents that chew bark and girdle trees.

Why mulch at all?

Urban landscapes are typically harsh environments with poor soil conditions, little organic matter, and big fluctuations in temperature and moisture - all "unfriendly" . A 2- to 4-inch layer of organic mulch can mimic the more natural environment for trees and improve overall plant health.

These shallow roots are essential for taking up water and minerals for trees, and they require oxygen to survive, Skiera says. The thin layer of mulch, applied as broadly as practical, can improve the soil structure, oxygen levels, temperature, and moisture availability where these roots grow.

To ensure the health of your trees and plants, follow these practical mulching tips to landscape, like the pros: For well-drained sites, apply a 2- to 4-inch layer of mulch. If drainage problems exist, use the thinner layer. · If mulch is already present, check the depth. Do not add mulch if there is already sufficient layer (2 to 4 inches) in place. Instead, rake the old mulch to break up any matted layers and refresh the appearance.
· Avoiding mulch against the tree trunks. · If mulch is already piled against the stems or tree trunks, pull it back several inches so that the base of the trunk and the root crown are exposed.
· Mulch out to the tree's drip line or beyond if possible. · Most commonly used mulches work well in most landscapes. Be mindful of the fact that some plants may benefit from the use of a slightly acidifying mulch such as pine bark. · Organic mulches are preferable for their soil-enhancing properties. Be sure it is well aerated and composted to avoid sour-smelling mulch.
· Avoid using uncomposted wood chips that have been piled deeply without exposure to oxygen.

Translation - Spanish Proper padding techniques, key to achieving healthy trees

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Atlanta High Museum of Art

"Everything in moderation should be the garden owner's maximum when it comes to quilting," says Jim Skiera, Executive Director of the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA). "Although padding is beneficial, too much can be harmful for a number of reasons."

The usual recommended pad thickness is 5 to 10 cm, according to ISA. When properly supplied, quilting helps to maintain soil moisture, controls weeds, improves soil structure and inhibits certain plant diseases. The padding also protects plants and trees from damage caused by brushcutters and lawn mowers, as well as providing a uniform and care- ful appearance to the stands.

But too padded, either in thick layers or stacked together to the trunks, can cause significant problems to the garden owner, including:

· Excess moisture in the root environment, which results in plant stress and root rot. pests and diseases. · Deficiency or toxicity by micro nutrients. · · Emergence of weeds. · · Macizos with bad smell, as a result of anaerobic conditions and cushioning "sour." · Creation of a habitat for rodents that nibble at the bark and constrict the tree.

Why quilting?

Urban landscapes are usually harsh environments with poor soil conditions, little organic matter and large fluctuations in temperature and humidity. All these, "unfriendly" situations for the growth of trees. A layer of cushioning 5 to 10 cm thick can recreate a more natural environment for trees and improve the health of the plant in general.

These surface roots are essential to supply water and minerals to trees and require oxygen to survive, says Skiera. A light padding layer, extended as much as needed, can improve soil structure, oxygen levels, temperature and moisture available in the area where these roots grow.

Quilting Basics < To ensure the health of your trees and plants, follow these practical quilting tips for a professional garden:

· In well-drained sites, place a padding layer of 5 to 10 cm thick. If there are drainage problems, use a thinner layer.
· If there is already a cushion, check its thickness. Do not add padding if there is enough layer (5 to 10 cm). Better, rake the old padding to open the compacted layers and rejuvenate their appearance. · · Do not place the padding in contact with the trunk of the trees.
· If the padding is heaped near the base of the trees, move it several centimeters in such a way that the tree neck is exposed. · · Extend the padding to the projection line of the cup or beyond if it is possible. · Most types of cushioning are available for almost all gardens. Keep in mind that some plants will benefit from the use of a slightly acidifying padding, such as pine bark. · · Organic quilts are preferable because of their soil-improving qualities. Make sure it is well aerated and composted to avoid smelly cushioning.
· Avoid uncoated wood chips that have been stacked in great thickness without contact with oxygen. Use instead composite wood chips, especially if they contain a mixture of leaves, bark and wood.

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