Fernando Toala Barahona

I grew up listening to Ecuadorian music. My father was an avowed lover of Ecuadorian music, and from him I grasped the taste for such melodies. And I'm curious that when I was a teenager I did not like listening to that music, and now with a few years I'm declaring myself a lover of this rhythm.

I do not understand at what moment our generations lost their taste for this music, maybe was the globalization that has filled them with crap in terms of musical genres. Nowadays, the young people are ashamed of ours, and they hate to hear only a chord of some melody with an authentic Ecuadorian rhythm.

My father inherits the taste for the halls, albazos, sanjuanitos, yaravíes, parades , bombs, etc, because they carry the feeling of what it means to be Ecuadorian.

And in this country something strange happens, because our musical identity has been buried, when it should be the opposite, from the autochthonous new sounds and rhythms, and new songs should be achieved, something that almost does not happen.

Listening to national music means rationalizing an imaginary or dream journey, touring our volcanoes, our cities, cultural diversity and our customs and feelings. Most of our true music speaks of love, of life, of sorrow, of feeling, of sadness, of joy, of celebration, of our country. There are different versions of the origin and evolution of the Ecuadorian corridor, many of which lack historical and musical support.

/ p>

While some relate to the corridor with European musical genres, others associate it with indigenous music. among historians, Gabriel Cevallos García considers the corridor to be an Ecuadorean version of German lied, while Hugo Toscano associates it with the nostalgic character of Portuguese fado.

Musicologist and composer Segundo Luis Moreno finds a connection between the rhythmic accompaniment of the corridor with the bull rabón, a musical genre of the Ecuadorian sierra. the historian José María Vargas associates it with the "passage of the child", while other writers relate it to Sanjuanito and Yaraví. All these versions, whether of Eurocentric or indigenist origin, show the desire of to construct a "mestizo" national identity that privileges the roots with which we want to explain our origin, define who we are and where we come from. From a diffusionist perspective, the most accepted version is the one that assumes that the corridor is derived from the Viennese Waltz developed by Europeans in America in the Andes region of Greater Colombia (18th century); its cultural origins come from the rhythm and dance with root in the creoles and mestizos of the time of the Colony in America. The popular music of the ruling class, which was introduced to the present Ecuadorian territory from Colombia and Venezuela.

Ecuador experienced the popularity of the corridor in the early nineteenth century, and over time became the musical symbol of its nationalism. In this country there are sub-genres such as: Coastal corridor, Serrano corridor; Dance hall, rock hall or Recess hall. The Ecuadorian corridor, due to its yearning and nostalgia, is (of all the countries that spread it) the best known internationally.

Original song of the song Soul on the lips

According to researcher Ketty Wong, the Ecuadorian corridor since the beginning of the 20th century has been a festive genre played in the retreats or in the halls and it becomes a song with melancholic texts that reflect feelings of loss and nostalgia, although there are texts that express admiration for the Ecuadorian landscapes, the beauty of its women and the courage of its men and often these corridors in honor of a region or city are better known than the own hymns as is the case of the well-known "Guayaquil de mis amores" of Nicasio Safadi ".

" Because of its ability to integrate and generate different meanings among different social, ethnic and generational groups, the corridor has become the national music par excellence. " - Ketty Wong

ECUADORIAN HALL DAY

In 1993, on October 1 was instituted by the then President of the Republic, Sixto Durán- by executive decree 1,118 as the Day of the Corridor in honor of the date of birth of Julio Alfredo Jaramillo Laurido (October 1, 1935) Julio Jaramillo, learned to play the guitar in his neighborhood in Guayaquil. With two of his friends formed his first trio and made presentations in Manabí and Esmeraldas.

Fernando Toala Barahona

His first recording was a political campaign song, for Concentration of Popular Forces (CFP).

Another recording was made by Duo with the singer Fresia Saavedra, with two tracks, a yaraví by the composer Alberto Guillén Navarro and a valse by Gonzalo Vera Santos.

Although it seems incredible, Jaramillo shows in the statistics as the performer who has most songs recorded. No one on the continents has more recordings than Jaramillo, who accumulated something like 300 long-lasting records, that is, 3,600 songs. And yet he died without fortune. Some contemporary singers had to record only one song to become rich and famous.

Known as Nightingale of America and Mister Juramento, Julio Jaramillo is considered the best Ecuadorian singer of all time. It is the greatest exponent of the genre; is one of the symbols of national identity.

While it is true that the DAY OF THE HALL, there is a special deference to the Guayaquileño interpreter, but it is only right that we remember those VOICES of the COUNTRY, who "assembled" lyric and arpeggios, and enriched the Ecuadorian Songbook, there:

Srs. MENDOZA SANGURIMA

Srs MENDOZA SUASTI

Dr. EDUARDO BRITO

Ms. MAJOR MEJIA

FAUSTO GORTAIRE Ms. MELIDA M. JARAMILLO Dúo BENITEZ VALENCIA, The Brothers MIÑO NARANJO, The Brothers VILLAMAR, HOSTS MONTECEL-OLIMPO CARDENAS Trio The AMBASSADORS THE BRIGHTS Duo STROBEL MALDONADO. The prince of the Hall the Master Musician FRANCISCO PAREDES HERRERA, among others.

Documentary of the Ecuadorian Hall

Romance of a weaver

The soul in the lips < / p>

More news: The ESPN Novena: The Most Valuable and The Non-Regolating Phenomenon

  • Adam Floyd