Mordwilkoja slut - Bugwoodwiki

Hexapoda (including Insecta)

Mordwilkoja vagabunda

Compiled by Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University

Aspen primarily, but occasionally other

More news: Morgan Lee - The San Diego Union-Tribune

Mordwilkoja vagabunda (Walsh)
Homoptera: Eriosomatidae

Hosts

Populus

Damage and Diagnosis

Aphids feeding on the developing leaves cause them to become highly-distorted into leathery folded leaf galls. Galled leaves tend to remain on trees and may not be visible until after normal leaf fall. Galling is concentrated on the upper third of the tree.

Adults are yellow-green, pear-shaped aphids, with relatively long antennae and delicate, membranous wings, about 3/16 inch long. Nymphs are greenish, turning more cream colored as they age. Life History and Habits

Similar to other gall-making aphids, the poplar vagabond aphid uses two hosts during its life cycle. The overwintering stage is eggs laid in bark crevices or old galls on aspen or other Populus species. Eggs hatch in spring and the aphids feed on the expanding tips of the twigs. Feeding induces twig tips to form large irregularly shaped galls within which the aphids feed and reproduce. Several generations of aphids occur within the folds of the gall, and as many as 1600 individual aphids have been reported from a single gall.

In early summer, winged forms of the aphid leave the gall and fly to a summer host. Local hosts are not known from the region, but loosestrife is an important alternate host in other areas. After several generations on this host, where they occur on leaves, stems and root, winged stages are produced that fly back to Populus in early fall, mate and produces the overwintering eggs.

Associated Species

Controls have not been identified. Dormant applications of horticultural oils should kill overwintering eggs.

The information herein is provided with no intended discrimination and commercial listing, necessary to this guide, implies no endorsement by the authors or the Extension Services of Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming or Montana . Criticism of products or equipment not listed is neither implied nor intended. Due to constantly changing labels, laws and regulations, the Extension Services assumes no liability for the use of chemicals contained herein. Pesticides must be applied legally complying with all label directions and precautions on the pesticide container and any supplemental labeling and rules of state and federal pesticide regulatory agencies. State rules and regulations and special pesticide use allowances may vary from state to state: contact your State Department of Agriculture for the rules, regulations and allowances applicable in your state and locality.

  • Adam Floyd