London buses to be powered by waste coffee grounds

Biofuel made by blending oil from coffee waste and diesel will now be added to the fuel supply for the capital's public transport.

According to Engadget, Londoners drink around 20 million cups of coffee a day.

Oil giant Shell and United Kingdom start-up bio-bean have teamed up on a project to provide a low carbon biofuel for London buses that contains waste coffee grounds collected from high-street retailers. According to the BBC waste byproducts from cooking oil and tallow from meat processing is already fueling some of the city's bus fleet.

"There is a huge potential for this project to expand in the USA, which drinks the most coffee on the planet, 400 million cups per day", the Bio-Bean website states.

This also isn't the first time TfL has turned to biofuels to power its public transportation.

Coffee grounds are now being used to produce biofuel for London buses, it has been confirmed.

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Working with biofuel producer Argent Energy, the B20 biofuel contains a 20% bio-component and 80% cent traditional diesel.

Some 6,000 litres of coffee oil have been produced so far, the company said.

Sinead Lynch, Shell's United Kingdom country chair, said: "We're pleased to be able to support bio-bean to trial this innovative new energy solution which can help to power buses, keeping Londoners moving around the city - powered in part by their waste coffee grounds".

A company called Bio-Bean has found a way to power one of the world's busiest transit systems with spent coffee grounds.

Shell Singapore said, "The technology holds much potential for heavily motorised countries".

"We're pleased to be able to support Bio-Bean to trial this innovative new energy solution which can help to power buses, keeping Londoners moving around the city - powered in part by their waste coffee grounds", she added.

  • Rita Burton