Art at Home by Nauma: August 2010

To weave a circle, we need to increase at each turn. If the fabric begins to bend, it must be because we are weaving very tight, so we should switch to a larger crochet.

As an example I will use a pattern with half points, but can be done with half rods, rods, double rods ... whatever you choose! Only in the case of points higher than the half point you have to add more strings to the starting ring and also more points in the first round.

In general, when finishing a lap, a running point is made to join the last stitch woven with the first and so close the turn. Then the necessary chains are made to replace the first point and continue to knit the next turn.

But you can also knit without closing the turns, knit in a spiral. This is the technique used to make the famous Japanese amigurumis. I advise that at every turn mark with a crochet marker or hook pin the first point of each turn, so do not get lost!

My suggestion of pattern in mp:

Starting ring: 3 chains, join with a running point to the third chain from the crochet (first chain made).

Lap 1: 1 cad, 6 mp inside the ring, . (We have 6 points)

Lap 2: 1 ch, 2 mp at each point, join with a running point. (12 points)

Lap 3: 1 cad, (mp on next point, 2 mp on next point) repeat all lap, join with running point. (18 points)

Round 4: 1 ch, (mp in the sig 2 points, 2 mp in the next point) repeat all the round, join with a running point. (24 points)

Lap 5: 1 ch, (mp on the sig 3 points, 2 mp on the next point) repeat the whole lap, join with a running point. (30 points)

Lap 6: 1 cad, (mp on the next 4 points, 2 mp on the next point) repeat the whole lap, join with a running point. (36 points) etc., etc., etc.

Following this pattern the raises will all be in line, obtaining a form of 6 sides that is not exactly a circle but is something approximate.

If you want something more circular you have to change the places of the increases so that they stop being online.

For example: Instead of knitting what says turn 4: mp in the sig 2 points, 2 mp in the sig point. You must knit 1 mp in the next point, 2 mp in the next. point, 1 mp at the next point, repeated all the way around. aAui will have increased 5 points, but this will make the form closer to a circle.

More news: Creekside Park House for sale: 18 Beebrush Pl, The Woodlands, TX 77389 - HAR.com

Another way to make a more circular shape is by knitting more than 10 points in the first round. This will cause a shape of more than 10 sides to be obtained and will be a close approximation to the circle.

The general pattern of a circular crochet fabric would be:

• N is the number of chains to make the initial ring • Y is the number of chains that are made to replace the first point of each turn (1 half-point chain, 2 half-rod chains, 3 rod chains) ;

• X is the number of points that are woven inside the ring in the first round.

Round 1: And ch, knit X points inside the ring, join with a running point.

N chains, join with a running point to the first woven chain. (X points)

Lap 2: And ch, knit 2 points inside each point, join with a running point. (2X points)

Lap 3: Y cad, knit (1 point on next point, 2 points on next point) repeat all lap, join with running point. (3 points)

Round 4: Y ch, (1 point in the next 2 points, 2 points in the next point) repeat all round, join with running point. (4 points)

Round 5: Y ch, (1 point on the next 3 points, 2 points on the next point) repeat all round, join with a running point. (5X points)

Each lap increases by X stitches.

This is what I write to help all those who just start with crochet. Some of my students did not manage to weave circular, until I realized that it was because they did not understand that they were knitting. They just followed the steps to the letter, but never with confidence to know what the hell they were doing!

And thanks to these explanations, my pretty Sara (pupil more than adorable) I could weave the cap for her granddaughter with flower included. Bravo!

And now, not for anyone, you are weaving a circular rug with cloth border and going for a circular bag too.

I hope some of you will serve like Sara.

And to my friends crochet weavers who have long been knitting, I ask for patience for this post, but we must teach so that the generations that follow us keep alive this art and not only belongs to a few. Or worse! to be lost through the corridors of oblivion back in 2070.

  • Adam Floyd