Macron buses highlight new French president's mixed legacy

"The essential thing today is to give a broad and coherent majority.to Emmanuel Macron to allow him to govern", he said.

Mr. Macron, though the victor of the presidential election on Sunday, could be facing an uphill battle next month as many doubt his new party, Le Republique En Marche!, will be able to form a majority in the National Assembly. "But support doesn't necessarily translate in nomination".

The presidential election left France's traditional parties on the sidelines, with the conservative Republicans and ruling Socialists eliminated in the first round, and Macron facing far-right leader Marine Le Pen in last week's run off.

Valls said Macron's victory Sunday over far-right leader Marine Le Pen it was a blow to populism across Europe that gave a "terrific" image of France to countries overseas. "(Vall's) voice is not insignificant, but his candidacy will be treated like anyone else's".

Valls, who resigned as prime minister in December after he failed to be win the Socialist nomination for president, backed Macron in the race in March and has now promised to abandon the socialists and sign up to centrist La République En Marche. Macron's En Marche party now has no seats in parliament, though an opinion poll last week predicted it would emerge as the largest in the parliamentary elections next month.

Guillaume Balas, who coordinated Hamon's platform, said Valls "excluded" himself from the party with his allegiance to Macon's movement.

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Several senior members of his Socialist Party have already announced plans to launch new movements, inspired by divisions in the party ranks and perhaps by Macron's success. I want Emmanuel Macron, his government and his majority to succeed, for France.

"I will be a candidate in the presidential majority and I wish to join up to his movement, the Republic on the Move".

I will be a candidate in the presidential majority and I wish to join up to his movement, namely the "Republic on the Move".

The French government cybersecurity agency ANSSI also said on Tuesday that the presidential election commission had asked it to provide technical expertise on the hacking attack.

Whilst the president has the most power in the French system, the prime minister is largely in charge of implementing the president's domestic policies.

If Mr Macron's party performs poorly, he could also be forced to form a coalition, a common occurrence in many European countries but something very unusual in France.

  • Adam Floyd