Everything you need to know about Pancake Day

The 28 February was no ordinary day for children across the land who had their tastebuds tingling for this year's annual pancake day.

The word shrove is a form of the English word shrive, which means to absolve by way of confession and doing penance, so Shrove Tuesday gets its name from the custom for Christians to be "shriven" before lent begins. Shrove Tuesday - which can also be celebrated in the form of "Fat Tuesday" or "Mardi Gras" - is celebrated all over the world in countries like Denmark, Poland, France and Sweden.

That's why we enlisted Multipower ambassador Healthy Jon for this incredibly healthy (obviously, otherwise we'd have gone to Unhealthy Jon for a recipe), sensationally tasty, unbelievably simple pancake recipe.

Today, on Pancake Day- couples can be predictable and pernickety around the pan.

When I was growing up, my mum only made pancakes for us once a year. The Siúcra survey puts the number of pancakes likely to be eaten on that one day at a surprisingly precise 12,173,606.

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Bord Bia has previously said Pancake Tuesday originated as a traditional day for eating pancakes, as it was a good time to use up any stocks of milk, butter and eggs which were forbidden during the Lenten period. Yes you've got it, it's TODAY!

Before you start reaching for that lemon and sugar though, why not consider some special recipes we've pulled together to add an exciting twist - or flip - to your day?

There were no American-style fluffy pancakes, no blueberries and certainly no maple syrup. You can bung in any little bits and pieces of veg that you have in your fridge and top it all off with a dollop of sour cream for a Pancake Day like no other.

Russia, however, is lucky enough to have a whole Pancake Week - a religious and folk holiday called Maslenica that takes place seven days before Lent.

Here is a round-up of information, recipes and tips to help get you set for the occasion.

  • Adam Floyd