See a 'firehose' of lava shooting into the ocean

Experts say that temperatures of the 1-2 wide stream of lava can reach up to as high as 220 degrees.

The USGS has been publishing images from its webcams in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park since.

The US Geological Survey (USGS) has released incredible video of a fiery lava stream pouring directly into the Pacific Ocean.

'At Kilauea's ocean entry on Jan 28 and 29, the interaction of molten lava flowing into cool seawater caused pulsating littoral explosions that threw spatter (fragments of molten lava) high into the air, ' the USGS HVO explains.

Large chunks of the cliff fell into the ocean when the delta collapsed on New Year Eve, which led to the exposed lava tube and the current "fire hose" display.

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As the lava hits the ocean, it can cause explosions, throwing pieces nearby and endangering anyone who chooses to venture too close. The USGS website states Kilauea, "will surely continue to erupt through the rest of human history".

It is the biggest and most active of the island's five volcanoes. The stream was remarkably steady today, but produced pulsating littoral explosions that threw spatter onto the sea cliff. Spectacular snaps capture lava spewing down the side of Kilauea, ash spitting from craters and plumes of smoke rising thousands of feet in the air.

This crack means the cliff is extremely unstable and could be about to break apart and fall into the sea, reports 9News.com.

The lava flow streaming below continued on at a somewhat steady rate across last week, occasionally appearing wider and with holes in the sheet.

  • Toni Ryan